Archive for July, 2012|Monthly archive page

A physics model of a physics model

One of the hardest topics in school next to computer science is physics. Time and again I see students struggle with the topics, and I have to admit I didn’t find it easy in high school myself. So I started studying physics again using Khan Academy, and gained much insight into the basics. I have admired Sal Khan since he started his site, and as a school teacher I also think I should help him, and my students, wherever possible.

I started drawing a diagram of how all things in physics connected to each other, and while doing that, I realized there should be software to do this better. After a short search I found the wonderful D3 toolkit, based on web standards, just as I like it. D3 can create awesome diagrams, graphs, infographics, you name it.

So now I have for your pleasure and learning aid a physics based overview of common physics quantities. Click the image to see the actual animated model.

Some tips on how to use it:

  1. Click the diagram to automatically redraw it
  2. Drag nodes to change the layout
  3. Mouseover a node to see related info
force diagram physics

force diagram physics

Use in physics assignments

The colors in the diagram denote related quantities:

  • blue – essential axiomatic units m, l, t
  • green – related to movement
  • orange – related to energy
  • red – related to a single unit

To use this diagram in your physics assignment, look at the known variables. Find those in the diagram. Now see if you can combine those to make more variables: follow the arrows. If you can start from two known values you can usually calculate a third. You continue doing this until you have found the desired outcome.