Why is writing for the web difficult?

Blogging for dummies

I have been a web professional for over 10 years. In that time I have learned a lot of things: PHP, CSS, XHTML, JavaScript, XML, Photoshop. But one of the things that has always been harder to do right is writing for the web. The reason? It has so many conflicting motives, that it’s impossible to have one good writing style. Let’s analyze:

When we write for the web we most certainly write for the fast paced audience that has no time to read pages and pages of text. That’s a given, and it’s what sets it apart from writing for paper. The other characteristic is links: if you need to explain something, it’s easier to just link to wikipedia than to insert the actual text. Also you don’t want to infringe on copyright.

Let’s look at our goals for writing for the web:

  1. Make it easy to read
  2. Make it easy to use
  3. Make it easy to find (search engine position or ranking)
  4. Make it sell (in case you’re selling, but you’re always selling ideas)
  5. Make it look good

Those goals are also connected to viewpoints from certain people: the writer, the usability expert, the SEO specialist, the sales representative and the designer. These fantastic four have to make sure the page adheres to all their standards. And here is where it starts to itch:

  1. easy to read: plain fonts, short sentences, short text, clear message, bold, pictures and diagrams that explain difficult topics.
  2. easy to use: minimal use of text, clear and large buttons, minimal use of design elements
  3. easy to find: clear headings, short sentences, keywords in bold (not the same ones), no pictures required.
  4. sell:  everything leads to a buy, no navigation on cart page
  5. look good:  creative fonts, no bold text, plenty of  non-illustrative pictures (preferably photographs) and design elements

In my opinion you should work from the outside in: make it look good, then make it easy to use, easy to read, easy to find and easy to sell, in that order. But as you make it look good (design process) you can of course have some consideration for the other aspects. It should also be noted that SEO is still voodoo, since nobody knows how Google really works. Also, search engines, in particular Google, change their ways of working constantly and they get better and better at identifying your pages. So don’t try to fool them, it’s not worth it.

There will probably always be a battle between usability experts and designers, because their worlds are so far apart. But to a modern web user something like useit.com looks like it was made 20 years ago and doesn’t instill trust in a user, something that is vital to sales.

Remember I may not be an expert in all those areas,  but the ideas presented do come from the leading experts in these areas.

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